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HTM 01-05. Decontamination

HTM 01-05. Decontamination

Decontamination in primary care dental practices. Health Technical Memorandum HTM 01-05  Levels – KEY Essential Quality requirement: – to be complied with. Best Practise: – Strive to Achieve. Practise Infection Control Policy All practises must have a policy in place and available for external inspection. The policy statement should indicate full compliance with the ‘essential quality requirements’ In addition a written assessment of the improvements the practise may need in order to progress to meeting the requirements for ‘Best Practise’. Decontamination environment: Decontamination facilities should be clearly separate from the clinical treatment area” (separate room or rooms clean/dirty). Not all practises are in a position to adopt this ‘best practise’ due to physical restraints (example building constraints) however practises should assess improvements they need to take in moving towards these and assess and plan towards achieving ‘Best Practise’. View HTM...

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Clinical guidelines CG139

Clinical guidelines CG139

Prevention and control of healthcare-associated infections in primary and community care: CG139 clinical guideline (published March 2012) updates and replaces NICE clinical guideline 2 (published June 2003). It offers evidence-based advice on the prevention and control of healthcare-associated infections in primary and community care. New and updated recommendations address areas in which clinical practice for preventing healthcare-associated infections in primary and community care has changed, where the risk of healthcare-associated infections is greatest, and where the evidence has changed. View...

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Dental Unit Water Lines Contamination

Dental Unit Water Lines Contamination

The DUWL contamination is not just about microorganisms suspended in the water, the real problem lies in the presence of a reservoir that provides a constant and continuous source of bacteria, namely the bio-film. It consists of a microbial community that adheres to the inner surface of the dental waterline tubing. Most bio-films are heterogeneous in species composition and morphology, characteristics similar to those found in another bio-film with which dentists are more familiar with, dental plaque. On average the bio-film is 30-50 microns thick and is enclosed in a polysaccharide layer known as the glycocalyx, which provides the bio-films with the property of resistance to some chemical agents. Bacteria derived from the incoming main water are intrinsically resistant to most biocides. These organisms become the primary source for continued contamination of the system. The mature bio-film eventually becomes populated with a wide variety of species of bacteria, fungi and amoebae. In addition growth within the confines of the bio-film enhances bacterial proliferation by binding and retaining a supply...

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